The Influence of Alcohol on Hormone Levels

The increase in the consumption of alcohol in our society is nothing new. Throughout history, it has been an unaddressed problem in many countries all over the world. In our particular era, many people will see the negative effects of alcohol but will not equate it to the damaging of their metabolic pathways from the consumption of alcohol. We can now further discuss the negative effects of alcohol on protein synthesis and certain hormones.

Negative alcohol influence

  • Cardiovascular functions
  • Thermoregulation
  • Metabolism
  • Neural functions

Alcohol also has a direct negative impact on hormones that have a big role in muscle metabolism. We will be focusing especially on alcohol and female hormones.

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It is important to keep a proper balance in your hormone levels for overall health. Consuming alcohol can cause oxidative stress in your body by increasing the hormone cortisol. This stress hormone can cause you to gain weight and feel fatigued. This can be harmful to your health when combined with the other negative effects of alcohol such as decreasing testosterone and decreasing protein synthesis. If you are an active individual who drinks alcohol you may experience more muscle atrophy from the loss of protein synthesis than the average individual. I think now it is clear to say, active individuals and athletes should not consume excessive amounts of alcohol.

Importance of hormones:

  • Production
  • Use
  • Energy storage
  • Reproduction
  • Maintenance of the internal environment
  • Growth
  • Development[1]

Hormones require balanced amount and timing to function properly. Ethanol is a substance that can cause numerous problems and affect different aspects of metabolism by impairing “hepatic gluconeogenesis and subsequent glucose output and storage.”[2] A study also shows impaired alcohol and protein synthesis. There are some people believing alcohol and muscle growth myth, but, hopefully, awareness is raising. The main findings of the study prove that “protein synthesis and resulting muscle hypertrophy appear to be directly affected by ethanol.”2 Furthermore, more alcohol can also decrease the level of testosterone that is one of the hormones that is important for the body. If there is less testosterone in the blood, there is also less protein synthesis, leading to atrophy. It is clear that the effects of alcohol after a workout or before are not good. Every specialist should inform especially athletes and sports professionals.

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What is protein synthesis?

Protein synthesis is a vital process in transforming the food you eat into muscle tissue. Food is turned into glucose and either stored or used as energy in metabolic pathways. Once you have energy in the cells and perform sufficient resistance training, protein synthesis kicks in to repair the damaged fibers and make them stronger. However, it is not always so simple and straightforward. Taking our Balance Cellular Phytonutrient Protein supplement, along with having a balanced diet and exercise regimen, can help aid this process. With everything being said, we suggest you always discuss alcohol consumption with a healthcare professional.

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MEET CHEN BEN ASHER

Chen is a Functional Nutrition expert consultant,  leading authority on weight management, women’s health and gluten sensitivity. She is a clinician, public speaker, educator and Amazon Best Seller author of “What If Gluten Free Is Not Enough – The Balanced Diet”. Chen  uses Functional Nutrition to help you find answers to the root causes of your illness by addressing the biochemical imbalances that may trigger your health and weight.

Chen uses cutting edge lab testing to design customized nutrition programs to your specific needs as an individual. Food, supplements, and lifestyle changes will need to be integrated to bring balance. If you are looking for a personalized nutritional support, contact  Mor’s Nutrition & More Wellness Center in Cupertino, California today for a free consultation!

Mor’s Nutrition & More           |           Contact@mor-nutrition4life.com            |              408.966.4972

Reference:

[1] Woolcott CG, Courneya KS, Boyd NF, Yaffe MJ, McTiernan A, Brant R, Jones CA, Stanczyk FZ, Terry T, Cook LS, Wang Q, Friedenreich CM: Association between sex hormones, glucose homeostasis, adipokines, and inflammatory markers and mammographic density among postmenopausal women. Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2013, 139: 255-265. 10.1007/s10549-013-2534-x.

[2] Alcohol consumption and hormonal alterations related to muscle hypertrophy: a review. Accessed from: https://nutritionandmetabolism.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1743-7075-11-26rel=”nofollow”

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