Chen Ben Asher, functional nutrition specialist, functional nutritionist, board certified nutritionist, board certified nutrition specialist, functional nutrition, Nutrition Mor’s, Mor’s nutrition, nutrition4life, nutrition, Nutrition MoreFor any person’s daily performance, brain are an important part to help to carry different functions. Research shows that there are connections between sleep and its resetting for the next day. As people are in a rush and want to do many things, some sacrifice good night’s sleep for other things, but is it worth it? Find answers about brain function down below.

One of the recent studies was done by the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health.[1] They were trying to prove why animals need to sleep. The study lasted four years. Their research showed that there is a difference between synapses between awake and sleep. Synapses itself “are the junctions between two neurons, the larger the synapse, the stronger these two neurons can communicate.”1 For the brains to learn, the synapses need to shrink and to re-activate the neural pathways. Sleep allows this phenomenon to happen.

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Synaptic homeostasis hypothesis (SHY) theory

According to the theory, the lack of stimulation during the sleeping process reduces the activity of neurons, and thus the distance between neurons is smaller. Activating them with weaker stimulation is possible. The result in the next day is that it is easier for brains to make new neural connections and that means that it is also simpler to form new memories and have effective learning.

The proof to SHY theory was by measuring almost 7000 synopses before and after sleep. The testing subjects were mice. The findings showed that “the synaptic size correlated with the amount of sleep the mice had.”1 The more mice slept, the smaller synopses become resulting in around 18% shrinking.

Dr. Paul Nussbaum also notes that the sleep stage called Rapid Eye Movement (REM) is where “consolidation of information takes place.”[2] This means that not also sleep quantity, but also quality is important because REM stage appears along with the deep sleep and it is a stage where people dream.

There are cases when people who are rather active and rather workaholic still have some issues with weight. You can read also more about the sleep and weight gain link here.

Benefits of good sleep

  • Healthy brain function (better learning, memorizing, etc.)
  • Avoiding the chronic illness risk
  • Better emotional feeling (e.g., getting better with others, feeling less stressed, sad or other negative emotions)
  • Better coping with change
  • Less stress
  • Better problem-solving skills, etc.[3]

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The brain function is better with longer sleep. It is especially important if a person wants to learn new skills. It is worth to skip studying hard all night and try some good rest. Board certified nutrition specialist also suggests that when thinking to change lifestyle for better health, weight loss and other reasons, it is worth to consider aspects related to sleep. Otherwise, brains have more fatigue, stressed and overstimulated. Even a short 5-minute power nap can play a significant role to feel and work better. Have a good sleep!

Reference:

[1] Brain Resets During Sleep. Accessed from: http://www.worldhealth.net/news/brain-resets-during-sleep/rel=”nofollow”

[2] The Importance of Sleep for the Brain. Accessed from: http://www.rd.com/health/wellness/the-importance-of-sleep-for-the-brain/rel=”nofollow”

[3] Why Is Sleep Important? Accessed from: https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/sdd/whyrel=”nofollow”