Soybeans which are pure do not contain gluten. This is because the protein which causes reactions in non-celiac sensitivity and celiac disease occurs only in rye, barley, and wheat. However, this does not conclude the story. Findings show that some soy contains gluten. How comes soy has gluten, and it (gluten) is only in rye, barley, and wheat? This occurrence is probably the question ringing in your mind right now.

The presence of gluten in soy can have links to the farming practices. Wheat crops are usually rotated with soybeans. The fields that are used to grow wheat crops are the same that are used to produce soybeans. Same harvesters are used to harvest them and also the storage facilities where they are kept are same.  For transportation to the markets, people use the same trucks.

This “interaction” subjects soy, in some cases, to gluten cross-contamination.

According to a study in 2010 by Tricia Thompson, a celiac dietitian, soy has 2,925 parts per million of gluten (this is less 20 parts per million which are considered to be “gluten-free.”

Of all crops, soy is among the most cross-contaminated of all crops which also includes oats.

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Gluten containing grains to avoid

Wheat

Wheat germ

Barley

Bran

Barley malt/extract

Couscous

Bulgur

Wheat bran

Durum

Emmer

Wheat starch

Graham flour

Farina

Einkorn

Faro

Panko

Matzo flour/meal

Orzo

Kamut

Rye

Seitan

Triticale

Semolina

Udon

Spelt

Gluten-free grains

Arrowroot

Millet

Flax

Corn

Amaranth

Flours made from NetBeans and seeds

Potato flour

Montina

Potato starch

Soy (soya)

Quinoa

Buckwheat

Rice

Sago

Sorghum

Rice bran

Tapioc

 

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With the right approach and knowledge, it is possible to avoid soy and other dangers. Specialists will help to make right decisions so that you could choose the best food.