Previously you could read how bacterial imbalance can cause diabetes. This time we can look at another serious disease that makes visual and physical challenges. Any person who has had some rash is suspicious about its cause, but can you blame bacteria for having eczema?

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What is eczema?

According to WebMD, some call “dermatitis. It’s a red, itchy skin rash. It may go away for a while, then flare up again.”[1] It means that some people might have some rash temporary and then it might fully disappear (chronic) or the other kind is long-lasting. First, anyone needs testing (e.g., taking a part of the skin) to be sure that it is eczema. The further assessment might help to provide the best treatment to get the health as good as possible in every situation.

Not all bacteria are bad for the skin. Some might even prevent inflammation and disease like eczema. So you cannot blame bacteria for eczema if you don’t know what kind of them are on the skin. One of the preventive ones is staphylococcal types (e.g., Staphylococcus aureus). Also, exposure to certain infections, etc. in the early age can train the immune system how it reacts.

For now, one of the treatments that are widely used is antibiotics to kill those microbes and infections in general that might be the trigger of skin diseases. Antibiotics kill the bad bacteria and also the good one thus still altering the natural skin bacteria balance. Most of the current treatments give only a temporary relief. In the future, it would be good to see treatments that include beneficial microbes that can help to keep the skin healthy, for example, cream with special nutrients and beneficial bacteria.

Eczema triggers:

  • Dry skin
  • Irritants like soaps, body washes, lotions, foods, etc.
  • Rough and heavy clothing
  • Extensive smoke, dust, sand, pet dander
  • Stress and anxiety, etc.

 

Click HERE now to get balanced by a board certified functional nutritionist

Chen Ben Asher as a Board-certified nutrition specialist understands the complexity of bacteria and eczema. The process to become healthy again is complex and might require more than one treatment. Also, an endless circle of different triggers doesn’t help for treatment to work successfully. A person might need to fully change his or her daily habits, eating, etc. There are numerous supplements, antibiotics, etc. available so it is important to choose a good specialist that can help to make the right decision. Up next, look into gastric ulcers and bacteria.

[1] How to Live Better With Eczema. Accessed from: https://www.webmd.com/skin-problems-and-treatments/eczema/live-better-eczema#1rel=”nofollow”