Previously you could read about autism and bacteria connection. Autoimmune disease and bacteria both have an impact on the gut health. I, Chen Ben Asher, as a nutrition specialist, have seen various women having problems with gut problems that are also linked to different autoimmune diseases that negatively affect life and being healthy.

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According to WebMD, autoimmune disorders (or diseases) “cause abnormally low activity or overactivity of the immune system. In cases of the immune system overactivity, the body attacks and damages its tissues (autoimmune diseases).”[1] As a result is that the immune system is overactive and thus damages its tissues. That overall makes the body less effective to fight the real invaders and more prone to infections. In general, gut health and autoimmune disorders go hand in hand. Chen Ben Asher as a Board-certified nutrition specialist has seen many different cases including infections that cause autoimmune diseases. The immune system can attack the protective layer around nerves and brain tissue. Similarly, it attacks also other organs and tissues.

In case of asthma and allergies, autoimmune diseases are more common for those who haven’t received a proper exposing the immune system to different invaders to learn what is dangerous and what is not. A big part of the large intestine where there are different microbes. Certain gut microbiome can protect from autoimmune disease and other problems. That is the reason why some microbes, as well as bacteria, are good for a human. Killing them can cause imbalance. You can look at one of the previous topics about how antibiotics kill good bacteria. Some research even shows that certain bacteria can help to avoid type-1 diabetes. In this disease immune cells attack cells that produce insulin in the pancreas.

Gut health and autoimmune disorders are complex and require a long and well-thought treatment. There are different supplements like the ones for the gut support that might help in a certain case, but some other might need a more complex solution that will take more time and effort. It is clear that it will be worth it because of it many cases as a nutritional specialist you can see women who first complain about their weight or some inflammation when in reality they have a more serious problem with their gut – some autoimmune disease and bacteria.

Can I take probiotics if I have an autoimmune disease?

Probiotics might be one more solution in certain cases. According to PubMed, “probiotic use as capable preventive and therapeutic strategy in different diseases varying from allergic to autoimmune disease (AD) has been recently reported.”[2]

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Up next you can read more about bacteria and cancer.

Reference:

[1] What Are Autoimmune Disorders? Accessed from: https://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/autoimmune-diseasesrel=”nofollow”

[2] Any role for probiotics in the therapy or prevention of autoimmune diseases? Up-to-date review. Accessed from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23921494rel=”nofollow”